Alliteration in English Language

Lesson #177: Appreciating a Medieval English Poem: William Langland’s ‘Piers Plowman’

Every single language that is spoken today has undergone (gone through) many changes over the years, over centuries. This is also true of English, which could be described as having several phases or historical stages of development: 🪔 c. 500-1150 AD: Old English  This is made of the dialects of Anglo-Saxon tribes, with a very few words …

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Lesson #160: ‘The sand stirred and spun and scattered …’: Alliteration and Assonance in Everyday English

đź“™ The White House was on the edge of a hill, with a wood behind it— and the chalk-quarry on one side and the gravel-pit on the other. Down at the bottom of the hill was a level plain, with queer-shaped white buildings where people burnt lime, and a big red brewery and other houses; …

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Lesson #153: How Writing Is Made Memorable: Three Observations On A Poem

As a short break from the grammatical lessons we have had of late, todays’ lesson will be short and sweet! I have been looking forward to an opportunity to share a favourite poem of mine by William Blake (1757-1827). It is called ‘The Tyger’ (an archaic or old-fashioned way of spelling ‘tiger’) and is often …

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